Tag Archive: free jazz


13

13

thenameofthisband

mossteinmeyer

 

Thirteen: a mathematical representation of the one and the three. The three in one. A trio of musicians playing free jazz. Free jazz is the concept of many as one. The musicians play together as individuals and as a group. On the highest level the individual and the group are entangled and the action of one is the action of all. The idea of the highest level is this concept of one for all and all for one. It is a very common idea and if you look for it you can see it everywhere: the herd, squadrons of birds in flight turning as one, the body in which all organs work as one, minds thinking as one, dancers dancing as one. Mathematically 13 is just as easy and just as hard as leading and following at the same time. 13 is the number of the trio, 14 the number of the quartet, 122 the number of the 22 piece Accidental Orchestra. The reason this concept of simultaneity is so hard to understand is because it represents dimensions that are not obvious to how we appear to live in the three-dimensional world. We feel alone but seek belonging. Belonging in the sense of 13, or 14, or 122 for example represents the number of dimensions. It is a religious concept of belonging in the spiritual sense to a force larger than oneself.

 

13 is the name of our trio. It means three in one. The three of us play as one and music is the result. When we do not play as one, when we are not practicing close listening, it is no longer music but noise. To reach the higher dimensionality of 13 the members of the trio have to lead and to follow, trusting that the others are leading and following at the same time.

 

Free jazz artistically and aesthetically means entanglement of individuality within a dimension that always exists in potentia yet must be attained. This is why it is hard to play freely. Free is not free unless the individuals play as a group–simultaneous and at the same time individual; individual and at the same time simultaneous. The quantum physics mathematical representation of entanglement in which the part and the whole are one thing in itself, Immanuel Kant’s philosophical concept of the ding an sich, on the level of particle physics is the simultaneous participation of entangled subatomic particles interacting at a speed which is faster than light. They are no longer time-like or space-like because the action of one entangled particle or of more than one entangled particles is also the instantaneous action of all the other entangled particles. The action of entanglement is FTL, super luminous, acausal. The action of musical entanglement is that of the one and the many all acting as one.

 

The reason free jazz is so hard to play, to listen to, or to understand is that the individual must lead and follow simultaneously. The ego and the lack of ego must simultaneously exist. There is a dissolution of ego into a larger ego and the music on this level moves and exists as one. Time becomes relativized. Time is not linear but non-linear–free jazz strives to inhabit this experience of non-linearity, where the past is present, the future is present, and notes do not just line up but open up into the higher dimensions. Higher in sense of not our familiar three plus one dimensions in which spacetime exists but higher because these three plus one dimensions of three dimensions plus the dimension of time are enfolded within a higher number. The accomplishment of improvisation in a group is to bring this mathematical dimensionality into our common world. Any performing group does this–orchestras, dance troupes, country music festivals, music festivals. Where you have individuals becoming entangled there is this mystical sense of belonging to a larger group.

 

This is what I mean when I name our trio 13. We are individuals acting as one on the higher dimensionality of the three in the one and are entangled. It is also what I have referred to as faster than thought. I cannot think fast enough to improvise and to make music. I cannot act alone. I have abandoned myself to this higher purpose. It is the army, the navy, the act of war. In the musical sense 13 is the act of peace, understanding, sensitivity to others, respecting others, living with others both as an individual and as a group. As with any mathematical concept of dimensions there is no moral sense and action as one can be as good or as evil as we want or wish it to be. We act consciously to make it so. If our intent is to take this mystical acting as one and to destroy we are Lucifer and His armies. If we are bringing life and spirit into the world we are God and His legions of angels. God in the mathematical sense is not moral. It is our humanity which makes God into an avenging God or a merciful God. It is up to us to act as one to be good or to be evil. The difficult part is acting both consciously to bring something good or evil into the world at the same time we act unconsciously as a group to do so.

 

Once we decide to go in a direction the forces act upon us and we are no longer in control. Which is why it is so hard to maintain the level of musicality on what we instantly recognize as being on the right level. Good music, what I call music, not sound or noise, brings together not only the musicians but all who participate in the listening to this music. We have mirror neurons in our brains to facilitate the coming together of individuals, which fire sympathetically in the presence of others and allow us to speak, to mimic, to feel the feelings of others, and to express our feelings so that others can feel how we feel. We are usually unconscious of the action of mirror neurons so to make them manifest in conscious ways takes an act of courage and sacrifice; courage to take that first step, sacrifice to abandon ourselves to forces that are normally unconscious and out of conscious control.

 

So it all comes down to mathematics as a foundation and humanity as a moral force, dance and music as manifestations of entanglement, and feeling good when we belong to something greater than ourselves.

 

13=1 + 3=4=1

 

13=mossteinmeyer

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First let me thank the wonderful musicians who gave me so much inspiration in this project. When I first started thinking about composing a larger work I began searching for ways to gather together people who could realize the concept. Jason Kao Hwang, Carol Buck, and Steve Swell gave me leads to other improvising artists to join musicians with whom I had previously worked with who could interpret the music, solo, and make notes on a page into music, an art form I have dedicated my life to attempting to understand and express. Somehow people could feel their way into it so they accepted the challenge of working on new music with a person new to them.

I cannot do more than hint at what intuition and creativity are, even though I wrote my doctoral dissertation on it. The music took me over. I would awaken with new musical ideas emerging from my unconscious, opening a portal so more musical ideas could come streaming in. I wanted every musician to solo—accompanied by fluctuating combinations of orchestral elements with varying colors, shades, and textures. When I began rehearsing the pieces, something else seemed to be hovering in the room that we all felt, and we abandoned petty thinking to honor the emotion of working together on a project bigger than ourselves. There was no personal drama; we all checked our egos at the door. After only three rehearsals we were ready to record the two pieces.

C# or Bb/See Sharp or Be Flat is a 32 bar contrapuntal jazzy jump swing tune I named to remind me not to fail to see where I was walking or I’d break my leg—again—which I did last winter when I tripped over a curb, which is one of the reasons why I call it the Accidental Orchestra. C# or Bb is a contrapuntal theme and variations mixing jazz, rhythm and blues, and the joy of dance. It is a way to let this band really swing! Throughout I refer to Norwegian Wood (Beatles), I Feel Good (James Brown), and Bags Groove (Modern Jazz Quartet) but do not resort to familiar big band trope. This is a type of string orchestra but with lots of jazz musicians pushing the boundaries.

The next piece, The Old One, is less traditional jazz, though quite traditional as religious music. I take the soul on an heroic journey, guided by the great books I read back in the ‘70s on the Qabbala, the Tibetan Book of the Dead, and the I Ching. I asked myself, how can music, spirit, quantum physics, and tradition describe the passage of the soul after death to sit beside the Godhead? The Old One is a part of a musical tradition stretching from the first ritual over the dead to the Mass in B Minor (J.S. Bach), Native American rites of passage into the spirit-world, through the Jewish mourner’s Kaddish and Buddhist Chemphar (funeral) ritual. The Old One is an initiation into sacred ground. Each movement represents the experiencing soul on its journey.

The Old One begins with Inception, which, like the movie Inception, surveys shifting mirrors of a distorted reality pregnant with possibility, establishing a disturbing atmosphere. Next, I musically II “Bridge” the gap between this life and the next. The middle movement, III Tree of Life/Qabbala, expresses the mysterious and foreboding, yet ultimately ecstatic emotion of the pre-psychological mythical tradition spoken of only to the initiate. We progress through theTibetan mysticism expressed in IV Bardo Thödol/Angels and Devils//Wizards and Deatheaters by creating transformative instrumental ornamentations and emotion. I picture musically the ultimate objective as strong and yet yielding musical esoteric realization of Creation so as to end up with the soul sitting at the foot of God who sits upon the Throne of Gold as spoken of in the Qabbala.

It is not easy to form your own orchestra from scratch. I have a sense of urgency to complete this complex project. I assembled the best improvisers in New York and Philadelphia to play two extended through-composed suites that involve extensive individual and group soloing. The credits of each of these musicians are long and profound. I selected people who worked together in past configurations and then compositionally structured solo sections to combine these previously existing groups so as to reveal what long years of creative collaboration can produce. We prepared scores and parts, rehearsed and recorded the two pieces at Systems 2, an amazing recording studio in Brooklyn, NY, then mixed and mastered the recording by the incredible sound engineer Jon Rosenberg.

Playing in New York City for over 49 years, I meet extraordinary cats from all over the world. All the artists have agreed to work for less than their usual fee because we are collaborating for a greater spiritual good though they need to be paid again if support can be engendered. They experience the music and have bonded as they work out problems to make notes on paper into music. I push them to utilize structure familiar and strange as they solo individually, in subgroups I form and dissolve, and as a tutti ensemble that is strange and miraculous.

Members of the Accidental Orchestra: Jason Kao Hwang, Rosi Hertlein, Fung Chern Hwei (violins), Stephanie Griffin (viola), Lenny Mims and Carol Buck (cellos), Steve Swell (trombone), Vincent Chancey (French horn), and Waldron Mahdi Ricks (trumpet), Richard Keene (oboe), Elliott Levin (flute, tenor saxophone), Ras Moshe Burnett (soprano and tenor saxophones), Michael Lytle (bass clarinet), Michael Moss (Bb clarinet), Steve Cohn (piano), Billy Stein (guitar), Rick Iannacone (ambient guitar), Larry Roland (string bass), Warren Smith (percussion, vibraphones), Badal Roy (tabla), Chuck Fertal (drums), and Michael Wimberly (djembe, African bells and percussion).

What I call a renaissance jazz orchestra consists of a horn, brass, string, and rhythm section and harkens back to orchestras initiated 400 hundred years ago in Europe.  I discovered the concept in the 1970s when I liberated a book describing the Renaissance Orchestra owned by my father concert pianist H. Baron Moss which he no doubt obtained when he attended Eastman School of Music and Julliard. I had written and performed in larger jazz ensembles but always liked working with the few string players who could improvise. I trace the concept of a large group like this to the 1970s when, as President of Free Life Communication, a musicians’ cooperative in NYC, I was one of the first jazz musicians to use an improvising string section of extraordinary violinists, violists, and cellists in my group Free Energy.  When I formed the group Free Energy I was able to have the makings of a small orchestra which I subverted so as to play free jazz by adding a jazz rhythm section using multiple drummers in addition to traps.

In January 2016, I fractured my left femur by tripping over a curb. Homebound for months, I composed a piece entitled C# or Bb, See Sharp or Be Flat, to memorialize my accident. It grew from a 32 bar phrase into a contrapuntal theme and variations for 22 musicians. I then composed The Old One in five movements: I Inception, II Bridge, III Qabbala/Tree of Life, IV Bardo Thodol//Angels and Devils/Wizards and Deatheaters, and V The Mind of God/StreamingàThrone of Gold. To perform these pieces I have formed the Accidental Orchestra, named after my accident, with sub-meanings of musical accidentals, John Cage chance music, and the physics string theory of quantum superposition in 11 dimensions. The Old One, named after Einstein’s penchant for referring to God as the Old One, follows a musical transmigration of souls transitioning from death to rebirth as the soul progresses from one state to another on the way to reincarnation or attainment of its Buddha nature as described in The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and alternatively describing the passage of the soul from the death of the body to sitting at the feet of God as described in the Qabbala. Composers have followed this path to elevate audiences to a higher level of spirituality through music for centuries in all cultures.

I recorded the Accidental Orchestra Monday, Oct. 10—Columbus Day—in Systems II, an extraordinary recording studio in Brooklyn where guitarist Billy Stein and I recorded Intervals (2013), engineered by Jon Rosenberg. It is being released in 2017 on 4th Stream Records, an independent label I initiated in the 1970s.  Graphic artist and FIT Professor Karen Santry and Timoshii Paterson of the Jedd Group used photographer/video editor Bernard Feinsod’s visual documentation (photography and video) as a springboard to create graphics for the CD. Poet Steve Dalachinsky composed non-linear abstract liner notes. Publicist Jim Eigo of Jazz Promo Services is on board to get reviews and press for this amazing project. Thanks go also to assist/arranger/composer/musicologist/music director-conductor John Shea for assisting me on arrangement, score and part preparation, and for conducting this incredible ensemble, sound engineer Jon Rosenberg who did a masterful job recording, mixing and mastering, and to video editor and photographer Bernard Feinsod who shot the project.

Music that appeals to a wide range of people has to come from a tradition, a history, a culture, and a spirit-quest. Tunes—I’ve been writing my entire life. Large groups—I led 100+ musicians at NYU for the Jazz Composers Orchestra Association (JCOA), for the entire membership of Free Life Communication, and at WBAI-FM in my compositions. My spirit-quest begins with the first bone flute, extends through Renaissance chorales, Mozart, Beethoven, Bartok, Stravinsky, Charlie Parker, Thelonius Monk, John Coltrane, Eric Dolphy, to John Cage, Milton Babbitt, Elliott Carter, and to experimental acoustic/electronic composers. If you as an audience have heard the blues, danced to the beat, you have participated. If you find repose in serious music this will appeal. I am extending an American musical heritage, stretching from Charles Ives, Scott Joplin, Robert Johnson, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Cecil Taylor and Anthony Braxton into the future. From the perspective of world music I draw from the fundamental elements of folk music from around the world to structure jazz offshoots by abstracting rhythm, ragas, modes, and instrumentation. The audience I want to reach includes the core of New York based musicians to an audience of New Yorkers and ubternational musicians and fans willing to challenge themselves and their ears in all musical disciplines. My music is part of a history, a tradition. It is big, emotional, and takes you on a journey, an arc of melody, to leave you in another state, better than before, uplifted. We as musicians participate in this daily—we want to share.

Michael Moss, Ph.D.

Consider a black hole similarly to the way one considers a star, except you can’t see it.  Black holes have prominences, ejects large bodies of matter and energy along gravitational warps, and matter and energy explode along the poles of their revolving bodies.  No one can directly observe black holes but for the effects they have on their environment.  So, if they are stars, similar to a neutron star, revolving at a speed close to that of light, they will attract to them matter and energy which this extreme gravity well weaves into long strings at the most basic—Planck length—level of existence and spin out long bursts of gamma radiation which are composed of strings at the higher levels of energy.  At some high level of energy the string may become transparent to the gravity well of the hole.  In a way the well is spinning and that which enters the hole’s accretion disk goes down in a vortex of increasingly energetic particles like water being drained from a sink.

At the higher energies I posit an increase in dimensional unfolding unseen at the lower energies of the observable universe such that, at some point or threshold, the string forms, but it is transparent to the laws of gravity.  That string weaves itself around and vibrates at a high pitch which in effect bends space and time to the breaking point, the point reached at the earliest point of origin—the big bang.  That is to say its transparency to the laws of Einsteinian physics permits it to inflate faster than the speed of light because of the energy levels attained in the maw of the spinning, waving, sucking vortex—and the string escapes.  That it is observable at all is the resultant of the string—a long line of ejectant observable in quasars—returning to a level of energy at a distance from the source subjecting it once again to the laws of physics operant in the macro universe where gravity applies and the speed of light is a constant.

In a way, you can picture it as a gravity well.  Matter spins around it as it descends the well.  Matter passes through the event horizon and its energy increases as it spins ever faster the closer it approaches the center  of the well.  When it goes through the bottom of the well it has reached the Planck length of 10-33.  It drains through to the “other side,” transparent to gravity, faster than the speed of light—superluminal—along a straight line, kind of like going through a worm hole which warps space-time so that it reappears outside the event horizon where it once again can be observed.  The stuff of our universe is going down the drain and is spun into an ejectant and thrown off much like a spider composes its web of highly gelatinous silk that is extremely sticky and which has extraordinary tensile strength.

Energy at such metaphysical levels does not obey the laws of the physical universe.  But, that energy condenses matter and energy along its path so that it is observable in the form of cosmic radiation emitted from a quasar.  Young stars are born from the coalescence of energy around these vibrating strings.  The black hole births the stars by destroying the old shape and form of the matter/energy.

Once information is destroyed by the swallowing of the energy after it enters the accretion disk, it comes out the other end and the information is restored.  The process of evolution is initiated once that occurs.  Time has  been suspended once the energy reaches the 11th power.  When the 11th dimension unfolds, all hell breaks loose!  The inflaton is unleashed.  Nothing happens.  The nothing referred to in the Tao seems to me to relate to what cannot be observed “because” on that “plane of reality” a universe which follows its own laws exists within which these forces operate out of our space-time continuum.

I suppose, since I am speaking metaphorically throughout this thought piece or gedankenstücke, we are then in a kind of exalted state in which space-time does not exist, where eternity replaces space-time.  Nothing is no longer the negation of thing, but is in itself a plane of existence that occurs only at the Planck length at the Planck energy, attainable in black holes.

The hole becomes a spider, spinning out its web of power.  In effect, the web creates space-time.  In a way this could be a theory of continuous creation.  Space-time comes from somewhere, so why not postulate a higher level of unfolded 11th dimensional “reality” out of which space-time emerges?  In space-time, as opposed to eternity, the 7 dimensions fold up into unexpressed Calabi-Yau manifolds, multi-dimensional curlicues, leaving the 4 dimensions of our observable universe according to M Theory, the meta-string theory now referred to as Superstring Theory.  In a way I’m stating that if M Theory is correct, and at the levels of energy in black holes potent enough to light up into a quasar, the dimensions unfold—out of nothing comes something, out of metaphysics comes physics.

I could go on to make a connection between metaphysics and Metaphysics.  But here I am on shakier ground (if that is possible considering the thesis I am proposing is contrary to the laws of physics as we know them), so I will only suggest a correspondence.  If “true,” the black hole might become a metaphor for God the creator.  The creator would be the Creator.  I don’t think this is a stretch since religion appears to have prefigured not only physics but psychology and chemistry.  Religious thinking seems to me to be an intuitive grasp of our world.  Creation myths emanate from intuitive apprehension of worlds beyond our own.  Artist create pieces describing these worlds.  Now we have computer-generated graphics of galaxies colliding; then we had Jacob’s Ladder, a heaven and a hell, incarnation and reincarnation, levels of consciousness both previous to and following death, a spirit realm.  The major theses of western and non-western religions speak of realms beyond our own in strong terms.  All I am saying is they resonate with some of the ideas I am presenting above, but in a pre-scientific manner of thinking.

I am using words to describe a compositional device I utilized when composing my piece in seven movements, Black Hole.  In it, I place in the middle a movement that is conceived as the movement of energy from the heart of the black hole and is described in the literature as a jet.  However, I do not see jets coming from black holes like normal astrophysicists do (surprise).  I see them as 11-dimensional jets defying the laws of physics—M Theory—which I extend as a form of artistic license.  If you want to hear this piece it is recorded by PRO VISO and is out of print.  On special request I can make it available.  Please correspond to me through this post if you want me to burn a copy for you.

The strength of my speculations, axioms, and theses ultimately rests on observation.  Hopefully, mathematical models can be developed or have already been developed describing these interactions.  Nothing becomes everything and every thing becomes nothing.

New York, In Love

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Regina Ress, a wonderful storyteller, and I will be appearing at the Provincetown Playhouse in the Village Friday, Feb. 15 at 8 PM.  Located at 133 MacDougal, corner of Bleecker, follow link below for tickets.  We are celebrating the release of Regina’s CD, New York and Me.  I provide music in between each story.  I will be working with guitarist Billy Stein.  We really look forward to seeing you in this special performance at such an historical theater (watch out for the ghosts of Edna St. Vincent Millay and Paul Robeson).

Regina Ress , storyteller, actor, teacher, writer and long time Greenwich Village resident has performed stories of love and life from the summit of  Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii to  Copacabana Beach, Brazil, with stops across the US, Central and South America, and Europe. Many of her New York stories have been heard on NPR outlet WFUV’s Cityscape. When she is not in NYC, Regina is Storyteller-in-Residence at the Santa Fe Hillside Market, an artists cooperative and event space. This is her 12th year performing in this storytelling series and 10th as its Producer.  www.ReginaRess.com
Guest Musicians
Reed player and composer Michael Moss has been involved in the music scene for many years leading his own musical groups including Mike Moss/4 Rivers and Free Energy.  He has played with an eclectic group of musicians including William Parker, Sam Rivers, Dave Liebman, Dave Burrell, Badal Roy, and storyteller Diane Wolkstein.  Moss is President of 4th Stream Records and ERG Publishing, past-President of Free Life Communication (a musician’s co-op in NYC), and is the recipient of numerous Meet the Composer and NYSCA grants.  www.m2-Theory.com
For the past 30 years, native New Yorker guitarist and composer Billy Stein has been involved in multiple music scenes in and around NYC,  including R&B, funk, blues, rock, salsa, bossa nova, as well as both mainstream and free jazz.  The many eclectic musicians he has performed and recorded with include legendary bassist Milt Hinton, mainstream jazz icon Sahib Shihab, Latin composer Joe Blanco, the rock group The Coasters, and free-jazz drummer Rashid Bakr. Stein recently recorded the critically acclaimed CD “Hybrids” and is a recipient of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Billy Stein on guitar and I on Bb clarinet performed Billy’s piece, “Riverside After Dark” at the Westbeth MusicWorks First Fridays Concert Series on August 3, 2012.

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